How to Write a Resignation Letter | Downloadable Resignation Letter Template

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“Goodbye” is so darn hard to say.

Use our resignation letter template to make it easier.

To start a new job on the right foot, you should leave your old one on a positive note.

The resignation letter formula is simple, really, so we’ll keep this article short and sweet.

Here’s how to write a resignation letter:

How to Write a Resignation Letter

  1. Be Brief and Direct
  2. Say Thank You
  3. Offer Help & Well Wishes

 

1. Be Brief and Direct

No need to beat about the bush with the reason for your departure. You can share that with your boss privately.

Instead, go straight into it.

Your resignation letter should state clearly:

  • Your position
  • Company name
  • Effective last day with the company

2. Say Thank You

Express your gratitude – bosses appreciate that!

Thank your boss for the chance to work with him or her, various opportunities or responsibilities given to you, and what you’ve learnt.

3. Offer Help & Well Wishes

Emphasise that, being the responsible employee you are, you’ll wrap up your ongoing duties best as you can, and do a solid hand over to your colleagues.

You can even offer to assist with hiring or training your replacement!

Close your letter with sincere well wishes for your boss/company/team.

A resignation letter is that simple, really!

Download our resignation letter sample here to get started.

ResumeWriter Tip: Are your burnt out from work? Before you dive back in to your next job after resigning, pick up these useful stress management tips.

 

But I’ve got more questions…

Ah. We often receive these common questions from clients.

Here are our answers:

 

Do I need to give my boss advance notice before I resign?

If you can, speak to your boss in person before sending in your resignation.

Abrupt departures may throw a spanner in your boss’s long-term plans for you, your team, and/or your company.

Advance notice helps your boss plan ahead, secure your replacement, cover your workload, and adjust plans accordingly.

This shows how thoughtful you are, and helps you maintain a good relationship with your boss.

So, while you’re not obliged to do so, it’s good to give your boss a heads up!

 

What about a farewell message to colleagues?

When it comes to your closer colleagues – your everyday lunch companions; your water cooler buddies; your comrades in arms – our advice is simple.

Just speak from your heart.

Of course, you should also send a proper farewell email to your boss, team and/or company to maintain good relations.

 

Do I need to submit a physical letter of resignation?

No. Thankfully, we live in a digital age!

A formal email is enough to make sure your resignation is officially on record.

Be sure to send this to both your boss and your HR.

Employment contracts in Singapore typically state a notice period of between 1 to 3 months. This may be longer for senior executives.

In your resignation email, remember to state your effective date of resignation. Your notice period will be counted from that date.

 

Must I tell my boss why I’m resigning or which company I’m joining?

You can, but you’re not obliged to. It’s perfectly fine to keep these to yourself.

If unsure, use these questions as a guide:

Do you have a good relationship with your boss or colleagues? Will they be happy for you and wish you well?

If your answer is yes, feel free to tell them.

If your boss is vindictive, and colleagues prone to gossip, it’s best not to divulge this information.

It’s a bit of a grey area though, if you’re going to a direct competitor.

If you’re in a senior management position, you might be contractually required to disclose to your employer that you are joining a competitor.

For instance – if you have a non-compete clause in your contract, there may be a “cooling-off period” (check your contract for this!) before you can start work for the competitor.

Non-compete clauses typically aren’t legally enforced in Singapore though.

Aside from this, there are generally no issues with working for a competitor firm.

This is unless, of course, your current position gives you access to company trade secrets, or other confidential or proprietary information.

You may then need to communicate openly and honestly with your employer to work out a solution.

 

What if my boss rejects my resignation?

Your boss can’t do that. It’s actually an offence for employers to disallow employees to leave their job!

Under Singapore’s Employment Act, employees can resign at any time, either by serving notice, or compensating the employer with salary in lieu.

 

That’s All You Need to Know About Resigning

If you’ve read this far, congratulations! Resignation’s on your mind, which means an exciting new chapter might begin soon!

Just starting your job hunt? Ace it with a killer Resume and Cover Letter – follow our handy ultimate guides.

You can also steal inspiration from our downloadable resume samples for different industries and roles.

But if you’re not getting the interviews you deserve, just reach out to us for help. Our team of HR experts will give you free pointers on improving your CV.

Before you leave this article though, don’t forget to download our resignation letter sample.

And when the time comes, you’ll know what to do.

 

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